Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.  The  TacTiles  are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.  Each  TacTile  fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.  To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.  The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged  Escorts for the Blind  tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.

The TacTiles are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.

Each TacTile fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.

To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.

The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged Escorts for the Blind tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.  The  TacTiles  are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.  Each  TacTile  fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.  To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.  The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged  Escorts for the Blind  tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.

The TacTiles are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.

Each TacTile fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.

To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.

The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged Escorts for the Blind tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  Tactile showing :   Adriaen van der Spelt and Frans van Mieris , Dutch, 1630-1673 & 1635-1681, Trompe-l'Oeil Still Life with a Flower Garland and a Curtain, 1658, Oil on panel, 46.5 x 63.9 cm, Wirt D. Walker Fund, 1949.585.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

Tactile showing:
Adriaen van der Spelt and Frans van Mieris, Dutch, 1630-1673 & 1635-1681, Trompe-l'Oeil Still Life with a Flower Garland and a Curtain, 1658, Oil on panel, 46.5 x 63.9 cm, Wirt D. Walker Fund, 1949.585.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  Tactile showing :   Pierre Auguste Renoir , French, 1841-1919, Two Sisters (On the Terrace), 1881, oil on canvas, 100.5 x 81 cm, Mr. And Mrs. Lewis Larned Coburn Memorial Collection, 1933.455.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

Tactile showing:
Pierre Auguste Renoir, French, 1841-1919, Two Sisters (On the Terrace), 1881, oil on canvas, 100.5 x 81 cm, Mr. And Mrs. Lewis Larned Coburn Memorial Collection, 1933.455.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  Tactile showing : Mexico, Tenochtilan , Aztec Culture, Coronation Stone of Moctezuma II ("Stone of the Five Suns"), c.1503, Basalt, 55.9 x 66 x 22.9 cm, Major Acquisitions Fund, 1990.21 top view.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

Tactile showing:
Mexico, Tenochtilan
, Aztec Culture, Coronation Stone of Moctezuma II ("Stone of the Five Suns"), c.1503, Basalt, 55.9 x 66 x 22.9 cm, Major Acquisitions Fund, 1990.21 top view.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  Tactile showing : Tosa Mitsuoki , Japanese, 1617-1691, Flowering Cherry with Poem Slips, c.1675, One of a pair of six-fold screens; Ink, color, gold leaf, and gold powder on silk, 131.0 x 256.0 cm, Kate S. Buckingham Collection, 1977.156.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

Tactile showing:
Tosa Mitsuoki
, Japanese, 1617-1691, Flowering Cherry with Poem Slips, c.1675, One of a pair of six-fold screens; Ink, color, gold leaf, and gold powder on silk, 131.0 x 256.0 cm, Kate S. Buckingham Collection, 1977.156.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  Tactile showing : Joan Miro , Spanish, 1893-1983, Personages with Star, 1933, oil on canvas, 198.1 x 246.4 cm, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice E. Culberg, 1952.512.  

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

Tactile showing:
Joan Miro
, Spanish, 1893-1983, Personages with Star, 1933, oil on canvas, 198.1 x 246.4 cm, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice E. Culberg, 1952.512.
 

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.  The  TacTiles  are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.  Each  TacTile  fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.  To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.  The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged  Escorts for the Blind  tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.

The TacTiles are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.

Each TacTile fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.

To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.

The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged Escorts for the Blind tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

  Tactiles   for the Art Institute of Chicago   Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W  People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.  The  TacTiles  are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.  Each  TacTile  fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.  To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.  The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged  Escorts for the Blind  tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

Tactiles
for the Art Institute of Chicago

Cast Plastic Tiles with Nylon Tote
Each tiles is 11”L X 8.5”W

People of all ages enjoy the opportunity to experience and contemplate works of art in the museum context. ‘TacTiles’ are a new approach to presenting visual works of art to museum visitors with impaired vision.

The TacTiles are made of brightly colored cast plastic and are 8.5 inches x 11 inches and 1/4 inch thick. For the Art Institute of Chicago, the compositions and textures of 5 works from the permanent collection are intricately reproduced on the tiles, making these works available through the fingertips, to visually impaired visitors.

Each TacTile fits into a pocket and these pockets snap onto a shoulder strap for transportation into the museum. The pocket contains additional components that provide for different modes of understanding essential information about the artwork on display including a large-type print description and a Braille description of the artwork. The Storage/Carrying system is designed to be expandable and new ‘TacTile’s can be easily added. Each pocket has a large image tab to help users and their guides distinguish which artwork is represented on the ‘TacTile’.

To achieve a tactile graphic where the significant compositional elements and visual qualities of each artwork were easily visible to the touch we conducted several rounds of user-research and testing. Although less than 10% of the visually impaired population read Braille we followed the advice of our user groups and included a Braille version of the standard museum label information on each tactile. Users felt that including this information provided the Braille reader with autonomy when using the tiles.

The kits are available for public use through pre-arranged Escorts for the Blind tours organized by the AIC’s Department of Museum Education. This groundbreaking project was made possible by a generous grant from Beatrice C Mayer (Buddy) and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.